At first thought it would seem ridiculous or even arrogant to suggest one could cripple the finances of a political party. But, what if I told you there is a reasonably easy way to do this, and it involves wisely using the capitalist system that we conservatives value most? What if we can deflate the socialist dollar that threatens our entire way of life?

We can.

In a recent podcast, I discussed ways to shift corporate funding from liberal to conservative candidates. Money fuels our country, and the tangible spending begins with the consumer. A company’s survival is subject to the laws of supply & demand, and their competitive edge.

In the past couple of decades, that corporate survival has also been a co-dependent venture with politicians.

One of the greatest amenities we have in our free market, capitalist society is our freedom to choose from a variety of goods and services providers according to our own free will (in most cases).

That is also the way we can create a financial schism between the Democrats and their corporate donors. More than 73% of the capital muscle behind politics is attributed to large donor contributions to PAC’s and associated candidates. Those large donor contributions are only possible because those companies are thriving off of their corporations’ profits thanks to the consumer.

We have choices. For instance, 97% of Arby’s corporate political donations go to Republicans, where Sonic Drive-In contributes 99% to Democrats. If conservatives want to swing the pendulum of spending, and ultimately the high-dollar political contributions to political parties by corporate America, we have to start spending smarter.

Fast food? Choose McDonalds over Burger King, and KFC over Popeye’s. If you’re looking for dine-in options, there are just as many options. For Italian cuisine, choose Carrabba’s not Olive Garden. For an affordable steak, choose Outback or Texas Roadhouse over Applebee’s or Chili’s.

Drinks for everyone! But, what are you drinking? If it’s vodka, Grey Goose instead of Kettle One or Absolut. For the rum drinkers, Bacardi not Captain Morgan. Whiskey? Jack Daniels or Makers Mark instead of Jameson or Hennessy. Miller, Coors, and Lienenkugel’s, not Budweiser, Heineken, or Corona.

For non-alcoholic drinks, the Dr Pepper-Snapple Group products instead of Pepsi or Coke products.

Heading out to the store soon? Consider the following:

Dollar Tree not Dollar General.

Lowe’s, Shopko, and Menard’s, not Walmart, Home Depot, or Bath & Body Works.

Cabella’s or Sports Authority instead of Dick’s or REI for sporting goods.

If you’re streaming music, iHeartRadio is the choice over Spotify or Pandora.

Kwik Trip, Flying J, or Chevron instead of Citgo or BP.

Meijer, Woodman’s, or Festival Foods instead of Costso, Kroger, or Winn-Dixie.

Planet Fitness or Gold’s Gym, not LA Fitness or 24 Hour Fitness.

The Goods Unite Us website is a great resource to sort corporate donations by category, company, or politician. You can see how corporate spending breaks-out, and specifically which candidates are receiving the contributions from these companies. That is where my recommendations above are sourced from, along with cursory confirmation from the Open Secrets website.

The examples I mentioned above suggest companies whose political spend is primarily conservative versus liberal. In many cases corporations donate to both parties depending on local and national races that may be of importance to them. There are certainly many factors that go into these donations, and it’s something you should consider based on your own local economy and sociopolitical factors.

The companies I recommended to stay away from are either donating heavily to the Democrats, or they put their money behind Hilary Clinton in 2016. Or both.

Changing our spending habits can be difficult, especially where we are attached to our preferences. It’s a personal choice. For many of us there are a variety of reasons we shop where we do, whether for convenience, accessibility, or particular products.

However, if we are serious about defunding the Democrats we can absolutely shift the political dollar by spending smarter and more focused on corporations whose campaign contributions predominantly go to conservative PAC’s and candidates.

Collectively, we have enormous financial power. Our voice as a consumer speaks more than words, and much louder when we are on the same page. The recent binge of Goya products is an example of that. Imagine if we could adjust our habits in all of the ways above, and so many more?

We could defund the Democrats.